vacances-06.info Sony Drivers DRIVE JAMES SALLIS EBOOK

Drive james sallis ebook

admin Sony Drivers

Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Starred Review. I drive. That's what I do. All I do. Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Mystery, Thriller & Suspense. Set mostly in Arizona and L.A., the story is, according to Sallis, ”about a guy who does stunt driving for movies by day and drives for criminals at night. In classic. Read "Driven The sequel to Drive" by James Sallis with Rakuten Kobo. At the end of Drive, Driver has killed Bernie Rose, "the only one he ever mourned,".


Uploader: REYNA GALLINA
Published: 22.09.2016
File Size: 17.58 MB
Operating Systems: Windows NT/2000/XP/2003//7/8/10 or MacOS 10/X
Downloads: 40335
Price: Free* [*Regsitration Required!]

Read "Driven The sequel to Drive" by James Sallis available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first purchase. At the end of Drive, Driver has. James Sallis has published eighteen novels, including Drive, which was made into a now-iconic film, and the six-volume Lew Griffin series. He is a recipient of. I drive. That's what I do. All I do.''Much later, as he sat with his back against an inside wall of a Motel 6 just north of Phoenix, watching the pool of blood lap.

The Luminaries. In classic noir fashion, he is double-crossed and, though before he has never participated in the violence 'I drive. Tony Parsons. Overall, I enjoyed it. There's nothing slapdash or merely strategic about his work View all 6 comments.

But in terms of substance, it was just sorely lacking. Mysterious, invincible Driver makes for a stylis Like most of the recent reviewers, I read this after seeing the movie, which undoubtedly changed how I viewed the book. Mysterious, invincible Driver makes for a stylish idea, but he was so abstract and mysterious and invincible that that's all he was - an idea, not a character. The book jumped around and was so vague about the characters that I had no idea what was happening or who it was happening to.

This book is beautiful but empty. The movie kept the style but added clarity, and that's why I ended up enjoying the movie more. By all means, read the book if it sounds interesting to you - it's short and quick and interesting. But it could have been much better than it was.

The thing about movies made from novels is often which one you experience first colours your experience of the other.

I loved Drive the movie. I thought it vibrant, intriguing, uber violent and effortlessly COOL. A loner deciding to risk his life to stand up and be counted for a wife and child was an affecting story and the ending was apt.

James Sallis' novel differs rather wildly from the cinematic story and unfortunately suffers by comparison. The book jumps all over a timeline more to hide th The thing about movies made from novels is often which one you experience first colours your experience of the other. The book jumps all over a timeline more to hide the fact that the story is so simple and basic than for dramatic effect the movie wisely foregoes this.

I much preferred the decisions made by the screenwriter than Sallis regarding the fate of certain characters and the movie definitely takes greater advantage of the concept than the book.

A shame is the fact that viewing the movie first will only leave you waiting for the cool stuff to happen whilst reading the novel and ultimately being disappointed.

Would I have liked the novel more had I read it first and viewed the movie second? Drive is stark, brutal, beautiful, and perfect. Language cut to the bone but retaining a beautiful flow.. Emotional, detailed descriptions of food, music and cars while the equally omnipresent violence and death is presented in a matter of fact dead pan. A narrative pitched between 40's noir, 70's cult flick, and a French existential novel.

Funny, furious and readable, Sallis should be ranked with, while not quite resembling, American existentialists like McCarthy, Denis Johnson, Lucius Shepard, Drive is stark, brutal, beautiful, and perfect. This book is a great introduction to the fiction of a writer who I already loved as an essayist and critic. Apr 10, Algernon Darth Anyan rated it really liked it Shelves: Think Virginia Woolf with dead bodies and car chases, she says. What I always say. Treatment, redo, or a shooting script?

When do you need it? What it pays? Both of them are professionals, they work for pay, one to write movies, the other to drive the cars as a stuntman. If you don't "Something radically new, the producer tells me. If you don't believe there can be such a thing as an existentialist novel with dead bodies and car chases, then I present to you James Sallis, about the best writer I know who can deliver it.

Driver wasn't much of a reader. Wasn't much of a movie person either, you came right down to it. He'd liked 'Road House', but that was a long time back. He never went to the movies he drove for, but sometimes, after hanging out with screenwriters, who tended to be the other guys on set with nothing much to do for most of the day, he'd read the books they were based on.

Don't ask him why. The novel oozes style and menace. It dances around deftly around highbrow references only to plunge you suddenly down in the gutter with blood slipping through your fingers from a bullet in the guts. The time frame is fractured and rearranged, jumping back and forth in the story until, like the movie version, it becomes more of a visceral experience than a by-the-numbers heist script.

Which is also a valid description, by the way. I don't take part. I don't know anyone. I don't carry weapons. Driver is a runaway kid from one of the hot Midwestern states. He travels light, but he carries a heavy baggage of trauma from witnessing his mother cut his father's throat at the dinner table. He doesn't talk much, but he has street smarts that allow him to sell out his one marketable skill. Officially, to the movies as a stuntman, and unofficially as a runaway driver in hit and run 'scores'.

Like most professional men, his word is his honor, and he is both reliable on the sets and principled with the criminal underworld. When one of the clients betrays him and lands him in hot water with the mob boss who ordered the fake robbery, Driver must go against the organization and its paid killers. He brings to the game the full force of his skill and determination. Soon dead bodies and car chases are all over the place.

When he walked, his arms flailed about and he shambled. If he tried to run, often as not he'd trip and fall over. One thing he could do, though, was drive. And he drove like a son of a bitch. That's the thriller part of the novel, but there are also numerous quiet, introspective moments, showing Driver to be much more mature and self aware than his green years would led one to believe. These lyrical touches are what put James Sallis on my favorite writers list before, and why I consider he is in top form here, also.

He existed a step or two to one side of the common world, largely out of sight, a shadow, all but invisible. Whatever he owned, either he could hoist it on his back and lug it along or he could walk away from it.

Anonymity was the thing he loved most about the city, being a part of it and apart from it at the same time. Whatever counters or denies this can't be life, it has to be something else. I saw the movie version before I read the book.

James Sallis

I admit that the adaptation is one of the best treatments I have seen recently of a written material, yet I would still recommend both, the novel especially for the elegant, evocative writing that is so hard to capture on screen.

Hell of a country, hell of a country. Anything's possible, anything at all. Even if it does look like God squatted down here, farted, and lit a match to it. I'll never look at pictures of Arizona with the same eyes after reading lines like this. If the narrative style of Pulp Fiction and the raw action of Steve Mcqueen's classic Bullitt had a child together, this book would probably be that child. It's cool, slick, slim, and efficient.

And it still manages to be remarkably touching at times. This little novel is as American as a Mustang with a roaring V8 and a cold Budweiser on a hot California day, but it is also an alluring and poetic description of a stuntman and part-time getaway driver who lives simply, kills violently, and drives If the narrative style of Pulp Fiction and the raw action of Steve Mcqueen's classic Bullitt had a child together, this book would probably be that child.

This little novel is as American as a Mustang with a roaring V8 and a cold Budweiser on a hot California day, but it is also an alluring and poetic description of a stuntman and part-time getaway driver who lives simply, kills violently, and drives fast.

In direct contrast with the other characters who flit in and out of the story, always scheming and double-crossing and trying to predict the paths their own lives will take, Driver finds that life is so much simpler behind the wheel of a car. The plot is straightforward enough, and focuses mostly on our young Driver as he escapes and battles those who have double crossed him in the seedy California underworld.

I quite enjoyed Drive , as quick of a read as it was. It is a contrasting achievement of grit and hidden philosophy, and for that I commend Sallis. Here he has written a novel that is refreshing in the way it takes the common tropes of the genre and turns them on their heads. The tone of Sallis' novel ebbs and flows in a blend of existential prose and almost deconstructionist storytelling that is quite rare for crime-noir.

Beneath the cars and the noir-laced dialogue is a book that is almost sweet, almost violent, almost poetry, and definitely fast. Rock Solid Noir Short, compact, deadly noir. Just wonderful work. Simple, basic, gritty. There are sentences and phrases here that tell whole volumes. This shows that you don't need to put out a five hundred page treatise.

Like classic pulp fiction, this is right on target, right to the point. Like Richard Stark's Parker, Drive is the only name you know this guy by. And it's the only thing he knows how to do. Hollywood stunt driver by day and the world's best getaway driver by night.

Drive yearns Rock Solid Noir Short, compact, deadly noir. Drive yearns to drive in capers. The problem is his partners never seem to focus only on the task at hand. They are often too busy changing plans and double-crossing. And in life, few things ever go as planned. Oct 01, David rated it it was ok Shelves: I liked the film because it didn't take itself too seriously. It was "Grand Theft Auto: The Movie" complete with Vice City's sexy pink font. The book has less of a sense of humour, and it presented a much stranger world.

What was with all the weird friendships in bars? Do straight American men really buy each other burgers and then go back to a trailer to drink bourbon and watch movies? Aren't these "tough guys" ever self-conscious? Driver leaves a huge amount of money, a homeless dog and a thoug I liked the film because it didn't take itself too seriously.

Driver leaves a huge amount of money, a homeless dog and a thoughtful note at the home of his adopted parents. A bit cheesy? A bit too "man from Milk Tray"? Did the character not think "Shit, I feel like someone in a movie"? The police are totally shit.

Driver is having meals with people in busy restaurants and then killing them in the car park. No fear of arrest. Three people shot dead in a motel: Driver takes a moment to calmly look over the interior of the Chevy and leaves at his leisure.

And yet stealing from a pawn shop requires screeching away at top speed and everyone screaming at each other. There was so much to like about this book but there were also some things that really bugged me as well. Driver is a mysterious protagonist but I felt he talked far too much for something that would have been more suited as the strong silent type. Full reveiw can be found on my blog http: Jun 07, Mohammed Abdi Osman rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Fans of Noir, modern or classic ones.

A short novel with only pages but it has more energy,thought,feeling than books twice its lenght. Its a modern Noir story as it should be written like. With style,skill,good characters. Much later, as he sat with his back against an inside wall of a Motel 6 just north of Pheonix, watching the pool of blood lap toward him, Driver would wonder whether he had made a terrible mistake. I was hooked from these opening lines. This short book was filled with tight writing, a fast moving plot, and lots of action.

Very different than the movie, but I liked it. I have a soft spot for all things Much later, as he sat with his back against an inside wall of a Motel 6 just north of Pheonix, watching the pool of blood lap toward him, Driver would wonder whether he had made a terrible mistake.

I have a soft spot for all things pulp and noir. The chemistry between Irina and Driver was more palpable in the movie. I appreciated how the movie expanded and changed their relationship from the book.

The rest was just noise. Favorite quotes: I run the team, call all the shots. Jan 28, Kirk rated it really liked it. I love the idea of this book but I think it's better in theory. Or maybe just not fully realized. This essentially old school Camus with a detached narrator who's such a high plains drifter he not only can't connect but has no desire to. Or so the premise wants you to believe. In reality the episodic glimpses of Driver's life pass by without really trying to cohere in some overall thematic statement.

I get the point that not making a statement may be the point, but without some internal threading of significance the whole shebang can feel as much an exercise in style as anything else, with Driver's life whizzing by as fast as the people who flit in and out of his life. I kept waiting for some larger idea to gel about the speed at which we live, the desire for velocity as escape, but, hey, why deal with that when we can talk about pizza and beer and Mexican food.

The sort of improvised feel of it all even introduces some odd inconsistencies.

Other drivers: COACH DSC CAMERA DRIVER

If Driver is so aloof and unattached, why does he care about the chicolita with the kid or his screenwriter friend Manny? And what's at stake with the whole gotta-kill-my-way-outta-this-mess main plot? Who was Blanche and why do we care? I'll even say the scenes of Driver driving felt a little artificial to meyeah, yeah, we get the D. Finally, a plea to noir writers: We get itthe ultimate humiliation. But seriously, I've read four books in a row in which murder victims, whether bad guys or good guys, evacuate, void, and express their bowels and not in that order.

I'm waiting for the next character to take the chocolate egress. Never have I felt the need to shoot some Pepto-Bismol from a couple hundred pages of fiction.

Enough soiling oneself already. No more doodoo need be done. Remember how Popeye in Sanctuary pooped himself upon hanging?

Drive (Drive, #1) by James Sallis

All right, enough negativity. Here's where the book to me gained some gravitas. The contrast between Driver and the gangster Bernie.

There's something almost operatic about their final meal together, very Godfatherish in its grandiosity. Honestly, I could've enjoyed a contrast between button-lipped Driver and chatty cathy Bernie throughout. I also thought the ending was pitch-perfectnicely giving the whole story the feel of a fable.

Overall, I enjoyed it. Certainly Sallis deserves his props after a long enviable career that includes a boffo bio of Chester Himes. I like the structurewhich feels heavily indebted to Mementobut in the end it maybe felt a little too random. I was missing those deep-earth architectonics that would show me some contriving.

We know the world is coming apart at the seams, that everything is fragmented and floating off in bubbles of impermanence. Let's let art in general and the novel specifically remind us of the pleasures of the well-wrought form. May 13, Jan rated it it was amazing. My first Sallis. Now I just need to read everything else he's ever written.

Jun 28, Ed [Redacted] rated it liked it. Sallis is an excellent writer who really focused on character development somewhat at the expense of the rather thin plot. There were some brilliant turns of phrase in this book and the non-linear narrative style worked for me, though it might not work for everyone.

I was hooked from the first sentence, one somewhat reminiscent of an old Parker book; "Much later, as he sat with with his back against an insid Another book about a getaway driver, DRIVE is a tightly written, dirty, gritty fast read.

Ebook sallis drive james

I was hooked from the first sentence, one somewhat reminiscent of an old Parker book; "Much later, as he sat with with his back against an inside wall of a Motel 6 just north of Phoenix, watching the pool of blood lap toward him, Driver would wonder whether he had made a terrible mistake. Alas, it is flawed. There is no explanation for the awesome death dealing skillz displayed by driver who, as far as we are ever told, "just drives" nothing else.

Some of the plot points are a bit too convenient for my liking. In the end, I suppose, this book was never about the plot, it was always about the enigmatic character known to us only as "Driver". All in all the book works, it just could have been better. Sallis is a gifted writer whom I will be checking out in the future. Chris and I both loved the film adaptation of Drive and thus wanted to read the novel, well novella really, that it is based on. The screenplay definitely takes it in a different direction, adding far more romance than the novel includes, which I can't help but like, but there's a lot in the book that doesn't get captured - scraps and pieces of who Driver is before he comes to LA.

While you wouldn't think the inspiration for one of the best action films of would, the novel deals with huge t Chris and I both loved the film adaptation of Drive and thus wanted to read the novel, well novella really, that it is based on. While you wouldn't think the inspiration for one of the best action films of would, the novel deals with huge themes, ranging from the American Dream to Manifest Destiny to the meaning of life. The story unfolds non-linearly, which although I think I might have struggled to follow it if I hadn't seen the film first, has a beautiful effect.

And perhaps it is my gastronomy studies affecting the way I read, but food plays an interesting role throughout the book, especially in the final scene with Bernie Rose. September Update: Here's a short blog post I wrote on the role of food in Drive: Driver the only name we know him by is physically small, perhaps even slightly S-L-O-W, son of a small-time burglar, a reader of noirs by George Pelecanos, a Hollywood hanger-on and stunt driver.

James ebook drive sallis

Despite these deficits, he can drive like some NASCAR fool, but better because he drives the streets on special jobs evading cops, improvising like a jazz musician. That's all he does: He eschews muscle-jobs or killings. But when one of Driver's associates shotguns two innocent bystanders while Driver the only name we know him by is physically small, perhaps even slightly S-L-O-W, son of a small-time burglar, a reader of noirs by George Pelecanos, a Hollywood hanger-on and stunt driver.

But when one of Driver's associates shotguns two innocent bystanders while trying to kill Driver and messes up Driver's arm to boot, Driver must broaden his criminal horizons. He must exact a revenge on his would-be assassins. I read this one start-to-finish in one short sitting, adrenaline pumping, rooting for Driver. This one really should be optioned for a movie. Nicolas Winding Refn. Aug 20, Malum rated it it was ok Shelves: I absolutely love the movie, so this book had a lot to live up to going in.

Things I liked about the movie better: The main character is more enigmatic in the movie. The interpersonal relationships are more interesting. The movie moves at a much better pace. Just judging the book by itself, it still had some problems for me: Too much filler, such as backstories of minor characters.

This novella would have worked better as a short story. Lots of jumping around in time, which I am generally 2. Lots of jumping around in time, which I am generally not a big fan of. May 11, Samolakisses rated it did not like it.

Drive by James Sallis · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

Are all these people giving this novella and movie 4 and 5 star reviews morons? It was so terrible. How in the world did anyone allow this thing to be made into a movie is beyond me?

Don't listen to all of these people recommending the movie either. They have terrible taste in cinema.

Long awkward silences by the characters, terrible dialogue and situations, and Ryan Gosling seems to be mentally impaired Are all these people giving this novella and movie 4 and 5 star reviews morons? Long awkward silences by the characters, terrible dialogue and situations, and Ryan Gosling seems to be mentally impaired throughout the whole movie.

The only good part throughout the entire thing are the first 10 mins--and then nothing. I don't mind violence on TV or in movies, but this was just ridiculous and all the while Gosling's face is an emotionless mask that doesn't come across as deep, but you're just waiting for a fist to come out of the side view of the camera and give him a good whack to wake him up. When I reviewed the movie on Netflix I was convinced that they were being written by family members of the participants of the film, but apparently there are a lot of not so bright people who find a poorly written, directed and acted film that was rejected from the late seventies and eighties and regurgitated last year or somewhere around that time to be entertaining.

Samenvatting 'I drive. That's what I do. All I do. Later still, of course, there'd be no doubt. But for now Driver is, as they say, in the moment. And the moment includes this blood lapping toward him, the pressure of dawn's late light at windows and door, traffic sounds from the interstate nearby, the sound of someone weeping in the next room He drives, that's all -until he's double crossed.

Drive has been made into a multi-award nominated film starring Ryan Gosling and Carey Mulligan, directed by Nicolas Winding Refn 'Sallis creates vivid images in very few words and his taut, pared-down prose is distinctive and powerful. The result is a small masterpiece' - Sunday Telegraph 'Crime novels seldom come as lean and mean There's nothing slapdash or merely strategic about his work Toon meer Toon minder.

Recensie s Imagine the heart of Jim Thompson beating in the poetic chest of James Sallis and you'll have some idea of the beauty, sadness and power of Drive.. Rather he distills it into a superbly potent brew that burns going down and explodes in the belly. It's a lovely piece of work that makes you wish some other writers would take lessons from him. The main character, known only as Driver, is the absolute best in the business both businesses, actually.

Thing is, he never, ever gets involved in the violence. I drive. Well, there's a first time for everything and when Driver is double-crossed and almost killed his quest for payback is as relentless and as methodical as his driving: Driver set the box with its large pepperoni, double cheese, no anchovies, on Nino's chest.

The pizza smelled good. Nino didn't. Driver is the classic noir hero. As things spiral hopelessly out of control around him, he sets about imposing some sense of order on the chaos. There's a dignity to Driver's efforts that transcends his rather questionable methods. His character is etched with equal parts violence and pathos without at the same time lapsing into either stereotype or sentimentality.

He is outside the law, over the line and way out past the signposts of conventional morality. Yet he knows more about right and wrong than all the cops, lawyers and judges combined. Driver came up from nothing. His hardscrabble existence included foster homes and eventually, inevitably, a life alone and on the road. Driving became his salvation.

Along the way he developed a sense of honor and character that remains unshakeable as well as a resolve and an unwillingness to be crossed that is boiler plated.

Driver's will, as Sallis describes it, is as solid and asimpregnable as the venerable Ford F Brakes that could stop an avalanche cold, engine powerful enough to tow glaciers into place. Bombs fall and wipe out civilization as we know it, two things'll come up out of the ashes: Got the job done, whatever the job was.

Like him. Lees de eerste pagina's. Reviews Schrijf een review. Lenis74 Rotterdam 15 december Geschreven bij Drive Ik heb eerst de film gezien die ook heel goed was en daarna het boek gelezen en ik was aangenaam verrast.